10 Oct 2009

Dog Tips: Learn How To Read Your Pit Bull Terrier

Dog training is an art and there are right ways to go about it, as well as wrong ways. An often overlooked aspect of dog training is how your dog communicates back to you. If you want to successfully train your American Pit Bull Terrier, you’ll have to work hard on understanding how he communicates with you.

You’ll only be able to form a close bond where you understand your Pit and he understands you, when you can read his non-verbal body language. An excellent way to begin learning about your Pit Bull’s body language is to watch his interaction with other dogs. This is just another benefit that you’ll get from a properly socialized dog.

So what things should you look for specifically? Watch how your dog responds to the movements of other dogs. How does he greet dogs he knows? Dogs he doesn’t recognize?

Ask yourself these questions when you are learning about your dog’s communication language and actions. Reading books about wolf behavior is another thing that you can do to greatly improve your understanding of dog communication.

“Why study wolf behavior?” you ask? Wolf behavior and dog behavior are closely related. Since they are both so similar, the interactions of wild wolves gives us a chance to monitor their communication habits without any human interference.

Most dogs, if not all of them, have a habit of licking people's faces and mouths. You many not understand why dogs do this, but close observation of wolves has shown that wolf puppies are fed by the older wolves in the pack through regurgitation. Mouth and face licking persists as they get older as a way of greeting another animals.

Spend some time trying to understand your dog and closely watching his communication habits. Before long, you’ll understand him better and the bond you share will be even stronger!

By: Tim Amherst To learn all about American Pitbull Terriers and training a Pitbull, visit http://www.pitbullsrevealed.com/ today.

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Pit Bull Puppy Potty Training: 7 Important Things To Watch

Potty training your Pit Bull puppy the right way takes time and a lot of patience. Many different things come in to play as you are going through the housebreaking process.

If you’ve been trying to housebreak your new Pit Bull terrier pup but have been having major problems, then this article is for you. It is very possible that you have missed some of the more important points when it comes to puppy potty training.

To help you out, I’ve created the following list. Take a minute to read it and see if you spot some things you may not be doing correctly.

1. Are you writing down your dog’s potty habits so that you can easily spot trends and correct them?

2. Is the entire family on the same page when it comes to training routine? Consistent repetition is vital to the potty training process, if you’re missing this element you’re destined to fail!

3. Are you going outside with your puppy to confirm that he is going potty when he’s in the yard?

4. Are you using a crate or gate to confine your Pit Bull pup when you can’t keep an eye on him?

5. Are you giving your little pup full run of the house?

6. Do you have unrealistic expectations of your Pit puppy and then harshly scold him when he messes in the house?

7. Do you keep your puppy’s feeding times and portions the same every single day? It is important to be consistent and don’t give him extras such as treats, etc.

As you can see, there are many areas which are easy to make errors in and a new dog owner must be very careful not to skip over any of these steps when trying to housetrain their new puppy.

By: Tim Amherst To learn all about Pitbull puppies and training a Pitbull terrier, visit http://www.pitbullsrevealed.com/ today.

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10 Great Ideas For Naming Black Dogs.

How can you look the dog in the eyes ever again? Every time you call his name, he wallows in shame. You've banished him to the lowest level of dog name hell - you've named your Lab "Blackey."

Any four-year-old can explain that a dog's name should reflect something about him - the way he looks, the way he acts, what he likes to eat… something. So most four-year-olds will take the next most obvious step - naming a black dog Blackey... or Smokey... or something equally inane.

The thought that so many grown adults were not able to muster more creativity could undermine our society's basic faith in democracy. So let's hope that the over-abundance of such uninspiring monikers is the work of children - parents' having left the honor of naming the family pet to junior or sissy. While common, this type of delegation is rarely a good idea. Remember: Dogs can last half a generation; your little tyke will be mighty embarrassed in college to own up to a dog named Blackey.

So to help inspire you - or your little one - here are some more unique names - and naming ideas - that might help you side-step the pit of pet name remorse:

1. Dirty Stuff: Grunge, Pitch, Soot (or Sooty), Spade

2. Darkness: Dusky, Midnight, Shade (or Shady), Twilight

3. Black / Dark Clothing: Patch, Sable, Suede, Tux (or Tuxedo), Velvet

4. Black Food: Gumbo, Goulash, Meatball, Meatloaf, Molasses, Mushroom, Plum, Rib-eye, Roux (Avoid Pepper)

5. Coffee Derivatives: Chicory, Latte, Mocha

6. Dark Beers: Guinness, Porter, Stout, Xingu

7. Small Black Dogs: (Also cute for very large dogs.) Scrap, Smudge, Smidgeon, Speck, Splotch, Wisp

8. Black as Evil: (These can be particularly cute for very large or very small dogs.) Cujo, Darth, Jezebel, Katrina, Lilith, Mordor, Reaper, Smut, Snitch, Sorrow, Vader, Vice, Wicked

9. Traditional or Famous Black First Names: (Most appropriate for African-American families.) Tanika, Aisha, Oprah, Bionce, Latifa, Snoop

10. African Geography: Congo, Morocco, Rwanda, Uganda

By: Randal Breaux : Randal Breaux runs the Internet Pug Club, a community of pug lovers, featuring special screen savers, browser start pages, electronic greeting cards, and more - all featuring the almighty pug. Free Sign-Up: http://www.go-pugs.com

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Why Does My Cat Drink Dirty Water?

You know that cats should always have a supply of water, especially if you are feeding them dried food. There on your nice clean kitchen floor is a bowl of nice clean fresh water, in a nice clean bowl.

What does your cat do? Maybe gives the bowl a sniff and walks away from it, or just ignores the bowl completely, as if water were the last thing a self respecting cat would consider drinking.

"Okay", you think to yourself, "Kitty just isn't thirsty at the moment". But then later, you happen to spy your cat busily lapping up stale water from a puddle in your garden as if it was nectar.

Cats are self-reliant, independent creatures, but surely your cat is not going to turn its nose up at the nice clean water you provide, just to let you know it can survive without you? After all, kitty does not reject the food you provide even though it is perfectly capable of catching mice.

No, the answer is not your mouser's independence. Tap water is usually treated with chemicals, often chlorinated strongly enough for a cat to smell it. Cats noses are far more sensitive than human noses and many cats find this chemical odor very offensive. Stale water in puddles and pools has a far more attractive smell are far as a cat is concerned. Puddles may be full of rotten vegetation and microbes, but cats find this organic soup very tasty.

As well as the off-putting odor of chemicals in tap water, cats find the smell of detergents repugnant. So, because you diligently clean your cat's water bowl in the interest of hygiene, the detergent that you use deters your cat from drinking from it. You use the same detergent to wash your cat's food bowl, why then, does your feline friend eat heartily from the bowl, and not be repelled by the smell of the detergent? This is because the aroma of the fish or meat is stronger than the smell of the detergent.

With the water bowl, the combination of the two unpleasant smells, the chemicals in the tap water and the detergent, means that your cat will only quench its thirst from the water bowl if there is no better smelling option to be had.

So, what can you do? You need to rinse your cat's bowl more thoroughly than you would a plate for a human. Remember feline noses are far more sensitive than ours, every trace of detergent needs to be rinsed off. Secondly, let the water from the tap stand for a while before putting the bowl down for your cat, this will allow the chemicals to dissipate.

These two things should have kitty drinking happily from the dish, unless, of course, kitty has got so used to drinking from puddles it just can't kick the organic water habit!

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5 Oct 2009

Quick Ways To Teach Your Puppy To Climb Stairs And To Accept The Collar

Bringing home a new puppy is always an exciting time for the entire family. Getting that new puppy off the right start with proper training is very important to making that puppy a valued member of his human family. There are a number of talents that every new puppy must master, including going up and down the stairs, and how to accept a new collar as if she’s worn it her entire life.

It is best to introduce a new puppy to the household when everyone in the family is present, and when the household is as calm as possible. That is why animal care experts discourage parents from giving puppies and kittens as holiday presents.

The holiday season is typically much too busy, with far too many distractions, for a young puppy or kitten to get the attention it needs. It is best to wait until the holidays have passed before introducing the new family member.

Once the puppy is part of the household, there are some things he or she will need to learn. One of the first challenges of a multi-story home will be learning to climb up and down the stair. Many puppies are afraid of stairs, and that usually means that they do not know how to climb them properly.

It is important for the puppy’s owner to slowly build the confidence of the dog, starting off at the bottom of the stairs. In general, a wide stairway will probably be less frightening to the puppy.

To build confidence, the owner should go up the first step, then encourage the puppy to join them, using their voice, treats or a toy. After the puppy has joined you on the first stair, go back down and repeat the process until the puppy will go up that step on his own. It is important to build confidence slowly and not rush the process. Taking a one step at a time approach is the best way to teach the puppy to not be afraid of stairs.

Another thing every new puppy must learn is how to accept the collar. Learning to wear a collar is important to every dog, but many puppies are baffled, frightened and bewildered by this new piece of equipment. Many puppies constantly try to remove their new collar by pawing and pulling at it.

Fit is important when choosing a collar for your new puppy. A properly fitted collar, chosen for your puppy’s size, is more likely to be comfortable and accepted. While choke collars, slip collars and training collars can be good training aids, they should never be used as a substitute for a sturdy buckle type collar. And of course that collar should have an identification tag and license attached. This identification will be vital in having your puppy returned if she becomes separated from you.

The best way to introduce the puppy to the collar is to simply put the collar on and allow her to squirm, jump, roll and paw at the color to her heart’s content. It is important to not encourage this behavior by trying to soothe the puppy, but it is just as important not to punish or reprimand the puppy.

The best strategy is to simply ignore the puppy and them her work through her issues with the collar on her own. Introducing distractions, such as food, toys or playing, is a good way to get the puppy used to the color. Getting the puppy to play, eat and drink while wearing the collar is a great way to get her used to it. After a few days, most puppies will not even know they are wearing a collar.

by : Jonathan Cheong at http://www.absolute-dog-training.com

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Puppy Agility Training

You may be asking, "When can I start agility training with my new puppy?" Puppies are always learning, so every time you are with your pup you can be playing and socializing with agility in mind. Always remember, if you can control your puppies environment, you can teach and train the behaviors you want, left on their own, even in a fenced yard, puppies will learn and develop behaviors that later we may want or need to extinguish.

One of the first behaviors we teach our pups is "Table" or "Box". This behavior transfers to the agility pause table. But more than that, the table is the center and control point of our puppy training. We introduce pups and older dogs to the table set at a 12 inch height. If you have a very small pup you could use an 8 inch table, but even with bigger dogs we use the 12 inch table and not higher. To begin, lure pup up on a low pause table, treat him for getting on the table. Once the pup is comfortable getting up on the table, then lure the pup up to a sit. You can also lure to a down.

Next you want to work on distance to the table. If you have a person to help you you can use a white target plate on the table, take the pup and step back from the table about 3 feet. Have your helper make a noise to get the pup's attention, and place a treat on the table. Release your pup to, "Go table." The pup gets his reward only when getting up on the table. If you don't have a helper, than place your treat in a covered container that will be recognized as a treat box for your pup. Leave the treat container on the table, step away from the table about 3 feet, face the table and say, "Go Table".

If your pup is very young, you can hold him as you lift him off the table and move away from the table. If your pup is too big for you to hold then use a flatbuckle collar and light dragline for your pup.

Now introduce your jumps to your pup. But you are not going to use the jump bars yet. First you want your pup to go through or between the jump uprights. Set a jump about 4 feet away from your table. Take your pup to the other side of the jump. So you are lined up pup, jump, then table. You want to get your pups attention to the treat on the table, either with a helper or a treat container, release your pup to the table, "Go Table". Let the pup run ahead of you, but go meet him at the table so that he can get his treat, praise him then offer him another treat for sitting on the table.

Progress with adding one extra jump at a time. Spacing the jumps about 3 feet apart. You are developing a jump chute that will lead the pup to the table. Remember your goal is to build the command, "Go" and "Table". You are also teaching the pup to move out ahead of you, working away from you and getting comfortable working around tables and jumps. Your pup is getting familiar running through the jump uprights, but you are not focusing on having your pup jump.

With all your puppy training, have fun with your pup. Use all your puppies motivators, praise, toys, and food. It is up to you to be more interesting to your pup than all the other distractions out in the yard.

By : Brad Carlson is a dog trainer at Agility by Carlson. For more training details, visit his website at http://www.carlson-agility.com

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How To Take Care Of Your Pet Parrot?

Parrots make wonderful family pets because they are great companions, they are beautiful birds with colorful feathers and you can teach them to talk. But you must have a strong level of commitment to your parrot because he will need daily and weekly maintenance, as well as plenty of attention.

What a Parrot Needs

When you consider how to take care of you parrot, you will have to consider what you will need to get started. The first thing you will need is a large cage for your parrot to live in. Make sure it is big enough for him to move around a bit and be comfortable. To occupy his time and make him feel comfortable you should place a mirror, a swing and a toy in the cage. You will also need something to properly line the cage.

What To Feed Your Parrot

A parrot should have a healthy, well-balanced diet. It should consist of fresh fruits, vegetables, nuts, meat and grains. Peanut butter and cooked eggs are other sources of protein that are good for parrots. Pre-packaged parrot food is certainly another valid option. It takes the guesswork out of feeding your bird a wide variety of balanced nutrition.

As with most pets, avoid feeding your parrot caffeine, alcohol, chocolate and salty foods.

Teaching Your Parrot To Talk

One of the most attractive features of this type of bird is that you can teach them to talk and whistle. Most people get a lot of enjoyment out of it. It does require a lot of time and repetition though and training should begin when the parrot is young. New words should be introduced with an activity so the parrot can link the two. He may even pick up on words you don’t really want him to learn just because he hears them often.

Whistling may come more natural for the birds and may be encouraged after you have trained him to talk.

Provide Exercise

Your parrot will need to get daily exercise. Let him out of the cage for small amount of time, starting with fifteen minutes at a time. Let them fly around the house and tire themselves out. See a professional for wing clippings when necessary.

Beak Care

Never try to trim your parrot’s beak at home. Seek a professional’s help when needed. Some things you can do at home to help your bird with beak care is to provide a concrete perch or a cuttle bone for him.


The basic things you need to commit to for taking care of your bird are quite simple, but they do require some effort on the owner’s part. In addition to never leaving his food bowl empty, you will need to provide him with fresh water twice a day. You will need to clean his cage on a weekly basis. You will also need to groom him 2-3 times per week. This can include a full bath given in a sink or washtub or by simply misting the bird and using specialized bird shampoo on him.

When all the work is done, you will have a beautiful pet that will provide hours of entertainment and joy.

By : Naldo Camarones from Resources about Parrots with lots of Information

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